Human Capital Management Solutions

08
31
Jan

How to win over passive candidates and not turn them off (part 2)

By Trevor Vas

In part one of this series, I wrote about what we should be doing before we start engaging passive candidates. Here, I’ll move on to the next stage – the process of sourcing and reaching out to these people.

As mentioned before, engaging passive candidates is one of the most challenging part of any recruitment assignment in my opinion and it requires more than a touch of skill and tact to get a candidate across the line.

These following steps are what we should be doing, based on my experience over the years, when sourcing and trying to get to these passive candidates:.

1. Developing a sourcing map/plan
A sourcing map is a visual representation of the channels, approaches, and other elements of a sourcing plan.

With a sourcing map you can be sure that you are keeping track of all the potential Talent sources and candidates you are uncovering, as well as ensuring that you cover the whole market.

By mapping it out visually you are able to gather feedback and additional information from Hiring Managers and other stakeholders.

You can also minimise the risk of missing sources and, if it’s an online shareable map, you can greatly increase your effectiveness by asking others to contribute their knowledge into it.

Here’s an example of a sourcing map:

Fig. 1 - Sourcing Map Example (click here to expand)

2. Developing and testing your call plan
Now we are getting somewhere. After developing a sourcing map, I will then use the information to build on my call plan.

A call plan is a strategic/consultative way of asking my candidates questions that will get them to take action (e.g. send me resume, have a chat with the hiring manager). Typically, my call plan will include Cialdini-style questions based on his six principles of influence – reciprocity, commitment and consistency, social proof, authority, liking and scarcity.

Here are examples of a few typical Cialdini-style questions I use:

Reciprocity
  • I have a brief document of how candidates can create an impactful LinkedIn profile, would you be interested in getting a copy?
  • I really like how you have set out your accomplishments, have you had many comments on these?
Commitment Consistency & Scarcity
  • We have some quality candidates on the short list and I will be closing the position shortly, can I please get your CV by the COB?
  • We have a video of the hiring manager taking about the position. It goes for two minutes and most candidates who viewed it really felt excited by the position and the company, can I send this to you?
Social Proof
  • Our Value Proposition seems to be favourably considered by the XX number of candidates I have spoken to, how does this sit with you?
Armed with this call plan, I ring up 2-4 low-prospect candidates with the skills and capabilities that I’m looking for to understand what is compelling for them and what will not work. Listen to the tonality of their voices and the questions they ask, this simulates reality.

Then tweak your call plan accordingly to further refine your questions.

When I learned to recruit, we termed this “Benefit to Need”. The candidate must gain a benefit from taking the position and they must be also able to fill the organisation’s needs. If there is a neutral or, at worst, a negative “Benefit to Need”, there is a strong chance the employee will leave for something else that suits their needs better. This match is really critical in a skill short market and is often overlooked.

3. Start with low-prospect candidates and work your way up
I generally do not go for my best prospects immediately. As mentioned briefly in my above point, I am constantly refining my value proposition to ensure that I have an amazing proposition on hand to offer to the candidate that I know would absolutely love it.

During the call, I also make sure I clearly express why I have called and what I am looking for. At the same time, I am trying to add value to the prospective candidate. I am looking for help and I also want to help them.

Mantra #2 – always leave your candidates in a better place.

4. Get into a positive state of mind
I need to be healthy and happy before I commence calling and emailing, you should be too. If I am not at my best, I do analytical or creative stuff instead of contacting prospective candidates.

I take my candidates on a journey, and I need to be at my best to really excel.

So what do you think? Love your thoughts on how you would engage passive candidates, leave them in the comments below. To read part one of the series, click here.

Post by HCMS - Human Capital Management Solutions
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22
Jan

How to win over passive candidates and not turn them off (part 1)

By Trevor Vas

What is a passive candidate? For me, it refers to someone who is NOT expecting a call in relation to a position.

Engaging these candidates is the most exciting part of any recruitment assignment in my opinion. Not only will you get to market test your skills and methodology on the job you are filling, talking to these candidates gives you instant feedback that may leave you pleasantly surprised (or otherwise). You just don’t really know what to expect.

So how can we excel in what I describe as the “We Find You” approach? In this part 1 of 2 series, I’ll outline the initial steps we should be taking before we start engaging passive candidates, based on my experience over the years.

1. Talking to the Hiring Manager to build a Candidate Success Profile
Just like an iceberg where 90 percent of its mass lie beneath the water, I spend most of my time preparing myself for the assignment as opposed sticking my head out immediately into the candidate market.

In every case it is essential to speak to the Hiring Manager and his/her team to find out their benchmark of a person who would excel in the role and the type of people who may be trained to undertake the position. During this process, I’ll also get them to consider high performers they know or have worked with in the past so I can better understand what they are looking for.

Some of the questions I would ask include:
  • Who is the best person that you have worked with in this position?
  • Who do you know of in the industry that would be amazing in this position?
  • If you could get a person and had no restrictions at all, who would that be?
In addition, chatting with the Hiring Manager will also help you spot bias within the hiring processes so that you can work together to correct them.

My mantra #1 is – “I need to know how you will know”. It is ok if they are unable to provide you with a clear direction initially, but what you will get are ideas that will help guide you along and provide you the direction you need as the assignment progresses.

2. Eliciting an authentic candidate value proposition
Understanding why a person would want this job is a huge clue to the type of person who would be successful.

The candidate value proposition will be both tangible and intangible:
  • Tangible is always easy to define and measure and includes items such as remuneration, career path, location, travel time, training and benefits.
  • Intangible includes brand, culture, team environment, work-life balance, leadership style and so on.
When I learned to recruit, we termed this “Benefit to Need”. The candidate must gain a benefit from taking the position and they must be also able to fill the organisation’s needs. If there is a neutral or, at worst, a negative “Benefit to Need”, there is a strong chance the employee will leave for something else that suits their needs better. This match is really critical in a skill short market and is often overlooked.

3. Gaining internal and external market intelligence
Not many people do this typically but this is crucial if you want to know how the value proposition of your role is stacking up against similar offers in the market. This market intelligence when consolidated is vital feedback to share with all stakeholders.

A simple search on job boards such as SEEK, Indeed and LinkedIn will enable you to find out the number of similar positions in the market, companies who are hiring, remuneration packages and locations.

Conducting further analyses using SEEK’s Talent Search and LinkedIn Recruiter will provide information on numbers of potential candidates with similar skill match, location and a remuneration range. Looking at salary surveys will also provide you with a good idea on how competitive your salary packages are.

Based on this picture, it is critical you look at your Position Brief and assess your chance of success. Briefing your Hiring Manager and their team will engage them and enable you to tweak the position brief, if required, to ensure you maxmise your chances of success.

Next week, I will go into the actual workings on how you can source, reach out and engage passive candidates. Stay tuned.

Post by HCMS - Human Capital Management Solutions
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